iVenturez: Outdoors and Adventures

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Anjarle, Suvarnadurga, Kanakdurga, Goa and Fattegad

Posted by itrekz on June 3, 2008

Anjarle:
After visiting Bankot fort and Velas, we now head towards Harnai via Anjarle. Anjarle is a small village embracing the shores of Konkan coast and is famous for its Kadyavarcha Ganpati at the edge of the cliff facing the horizons over Arabian Sea. This ancient and magnificent Ganesh temple was originally constructed using wooden pillars in around 1150. Later it was renovated during 1768 to 1780.

The temple at Anjarle is considered to be Jagrut devasthan and has one of those rare Ganesh idols with his trunk curved towards the right side (Ujvya sondecha Ganpati). The cliff offers a fabulous view of the landscape including the Suvarnadurg Fort. Beside the Ganesh temple there is a small but beautiful temple of Lord Shiva and a nearby pond with turtles and number if species of fishes.

Anjarle is situated at a distance of 16 km from Bankot village. It is at a distance of 24 km and can also be reached from Dapoli. Dapoli-Gimhavane-Asud Pul (bridge)-Saldure-Palande-Khem-Anjarle. After a brief visit to the sacred temple at Anjarle, we continue on our journey towards Harnai.

Goa fort

  • Region: Dapoli
  • District: Ratnagiri
  • Height: Sea fort (At sea level)
  • Difficulty: Simple
  • Duration: one hour to visit the fort

Approach:

* Bankot-Anjarle-Harnai: 23 km
* Dapoli-Harnai: 16 km
* Anjarle-Harnai: 7 km

Total distance is 230 km from Mumbai. Look Bankot fort for Mumbai-Bankot approach.

Sights to see: Goa fort

Water availability: Potable water is not available on the fort. Carry your own stock from the village.

Accomodation:
Harnai, Dapoli, Anjarle

Description:
On the way to Harnai port from Anjarle village, we come across Goa fort on the west. The fort is actually right on the edge of the land with the Arabian Sea lashing its waves against the west face of Goa fort. Unlike the other two forts: Kanakdurga and Fattegad, Goa forts is pretty much large and offers some dilapidated ruins signifying of its past. Spread over an area of approximately three hectares, the fort is squarish in shape.

As seen with Bankot fort, a dry moat surrounds the fort Goa on its sides. The Mahadarwaja faces the north and tastes the salinity brought by the indenting water body from this direction. The arch way of the Mahadarwaja is now blocked with blocks of Jambhya stones. A hanuman idol stands on the right side wall of the Mahadarwaja. On either side of the Mahadarwaja, the two platforms near the base bear carvings of two tigers (Sharabha or Vyal). On the right side of the Mahadarwaja is Gandbherund with the four elephants that it has captured. The compound name is made of ganda the mighty, and bherunda meaning “two headed”.

The land facing eastern side of the fort accommodates another entrance, which is now presently the only gateway to Goa fort. On entering the fort through this entrance, we climb up a small elevated hump. This is the Balekilla of Goa fort. The Balekilla is devoid of any structures with exceptions of few ruins and a water tank. Other than soldiers Devdi, a pond and few other architectural remnants, nothing much exists in Goa fort now.

The history of Goa fort is as obscure as its origin.

Kanakdurga and Fattegad

  • Region: Dapoli
  • District: Ratnagiri
  • Height: Sea fort (At sea level)
  • Difficulty: Simple
  • Duration: Half an hour to visit the fort

Approach:

* Bankot-Anjarle-Harnai: 23 km
* Dapoli-Harnai: 16 km
* Anjarle-Harnai: 7 km

Total distance is 230 km from Mumbai. Look Bankot fort for Mumbai-Bankot approach.

Sights to see: Kanakdurga and Fattegad fort

Water availability: Potable water is not available on the fort. Carry your own stock from the village.

Accommodation: Harnai, Dapoli, Anjarle

Description:
The origin of these forts is unknown in the pages of history, but it is speculated that these forts must be built as a watch tower for Suvarnadurga. Further ahead of Goa fort on the Anjarle-Harnai road lies Kanakdurga and Fattegad. Fattegad fort, originally spanning nearly a hectare in area is non-existent now and in its place is a well established fisherman’s colony.

Kanakdurga fort is the extreme end of the strip of land jutting out in the sea next to Harnai port. A flight of steps leads to the top of the fort. A few water tanks, which now are obsolete and crumbled fortifications is all that indicate of Kanakdurga being a fort earlier. On an elevated hump inside Kanakdurga stand a Lighthouse and the quarters for the caretaker.

Suvarnadurga:

  • Region: Dapoli
  • District: Ratnagiri
  • Height: Sea fort (At sea level)
  • Difficulty: Simple
  • Duration: Two hours to visit the fort

Approach:

* Bankot-Anjarle-Harnai: 23 km
* Dapoli-Harnai: 16 km
* Anjarle-Harnai: 7 km

There is no jetty as such for Suvarnadurga fort and one land directly on the sandy beach of the rocky isle on which the fort is build.

Total distance is 230 km from Mumbai. Look Bankot fort for Mumbai-Bankot approach.

Sights to see: Suvarnadurga fort

Water availability: Potable water is not available on the fort. Carry your own stock from the village.

Accommodation: Harnai, Dapoli, Anjarle

Description:
Suvarnadurga fort is a sea fort surround from all side by the lashing waves of the Arabian Sea. Suvarna means Gold and as its name dictates this was really one of the golden feathers in the cap of Marathas. As seen with the other forts in this region, a dry moat surrounds the fort of Suvarnadurga too. The Mahadarwaja of the Suvarnadurga, like most other sea forts, is not visible until very close to the fort. There is a small construction lying on the shores of the rocky isle, which probably hints of it being a watch tower in those years when Suvarnadurga was in its blossom days.

The Mahadarwaja of Suvarnadurga is on the eastern wall of the fort and faces northwards. The main entrance is now blocked with the overgrowth of thorny bushes of ‘Bor’; however one can enter the fort through a small entry from one of the Devdis. Near the Mahadarwaja is a Hanuman idol carved in the wall and one of the leading steps bears a carved turtle on its shelf. The fort is now densely occupied by the thorny thickets.

The fort has many bastions and two Darwajas. As described earlier, the Mahadarwaja faces the east while another Darwaja, the Chor Darwaja faces the west. Near the Chor Darwaja on the west is a small depression which gives an impression of being a shallow pond. There are steps leading down from the Chor Darwaja, on the west face of the fort.

Near the fort walls, just as one walks past the Mahadarwaja of Suvarnadurga fort, one comes across a well. However, most of the water tanks and reservoirs on Suvarnadurga cater potable water only till months of November-December and are dry in the summer months, so one has to carry their own stock of potable water.

There are small rooms constructed under the number of bastions that Suvarnadurga harbours, quite peculiar to this fort.. The fort tapers to wards the south and from this point, one can have a fabulous view of Kanakdurga fort jutting out in the Arabian Sea. There are two granaries and a dilapidated house occupying the central part of Suvarnadurga. The entrance of the Wada is still intact with few ruins inside the house.

A brief history about the fort:
Think Suvarnadurga and one immediately visualizes the revered name of Kanhoji Angre, popularly known as “Samudratla Shivaji”. However, much before this era, some historians speculate the origin of Suvarnadurga to date back till the Satvahana era. Another view on this elucidates that the fort was built by Adilshahi. It was later conquered and refurbished by Chattrapati Shivaji Maharaj in 1660. It was also a base for the Maratha navy ship-building facility. Suvarnadurga fort was the base for Kanhoji Angre who was the chief of Maratha Navy. Kanhoji Angre spent his childhood in Suvarnadurga fort, of which he was later the Governor. He set up powerful fleet of warships to protect the western coast of Konkan from British, French, Dutch and Portuguese attacks. Suvarnadurga fort is a landmark in Konkan. Following death of Kanhoji, Tulaji Angre took charge of Suvarnadurga. However, the headstrong attitude of Tulaji, saw the Angre’s disputing with Peshwas. The Peshwas later sought help of British to gain control over Suvarnadurga. In exchange for this service, the British kept fort Bankot with themselves as an honorarium and handed over Suvarnadurga to the Peshwas.

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2 Responses to “Anjarle, Suvarnadurga, Kanakdurga, Goa and Fattegad”

  1. […] https://itrekz.wordpress.com/2008/06/03/anjarle-suvarnadurga-kanakdurga-goa-and-fattegad/ […]

  2. […] https://itrekz.wordpress.com/2008/06/03/anjarle-suvarnadurga-kanakdurga-goa-and-fattegad/ […]

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